The emailbox has filled up with questions over the past few weeks, so it’s time for a round of Q&A…

What is the origin of Tsunami?
– Rhys (matrhys@yahoo.com)

Miya Shimada, a.k.a. Tsunami, is the daughter of Japanese parents who emigrated to the U.S. before World War II. Though a U.S. citizen, she turned against America because of the racial prejudice she encountered while growing up in California.

Because of her ability to mentally create tidal waves, Miya was recruited (and given the name Tsunami) by Japanese Admiral Yamamodo to use her powers in World War II. After being smuggled back into the U.S., she battled members of the All-Star Squadron. A battle with Starman and Liberty Belle resulted in the apparent death of her father; Miya later decided she could no longer support the Japanese war effort and disappeared.

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I just wanted to take a moment to thank you for your column. It’s been a great discovery this past year. I loved reading the details of CANCELLED COMICS CAVALCADE (and hope DC might actually publish them… someday). I hadn’t considered the impact the blizzards had to cause the DC Implosion. Recently, I realized that the warehouse surplus is what turned into those Whitman 3-Packs.

I recently saw one of the ads for the DC EXPLOSION and wondered what other new comics were being considered, that never made it? We see pictures of Hawkman, Atom, Barda, The Ray, J’onn J’onzz, Deadman and others (one or two I can’t ID). Were all these to be new books or features for SHOWCASE?
– Drew (Drumore@aol.com)

Some of the characters were intended to star in back-up series in existing or new books. The Ray, for example, would have been the back-up in BLACK LIGHTNING, while Big Barda was slated for MISTER MIRACLE.
As you probably know, some of the material did eventually get published. The chances of CCC being published in TPB form by DC is unlikely, bit I guess anything’s possible.

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Hey Bob,
1) Who will write and draw THE AUTHORITY after Ennis and Hitch?
2) When is LEAGUE OF EXTRAORDINARY GENTLEMEN coming out?
– Duckman (onepersonnottwo@interactive.rogers.com)

Questions like these are usually answered over in Silver Bulletins, just a click away from this column. THE AUTHORITY, by the way, is being canceled.

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What is the real reason for the cancellation of THE AUTHORITY? Thanks!
– kenperry@aol.com

I don’t know, but my fellow SBC columnist Rich Johnston has covered a whole bunch of rumors about it in his All The Rage (which, like the news stories, is just a click away).

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I’m thinking it might be fun to collect comics that were on the stands the month & year I was born: December, 1962. Given the oddities of comic book cover dates & distribution, would those books have likely been cover-dated February or March 1963? Also, what sources could you suggest for pin-pointing books from that or another specific year & month? Thanks.
– RSBerry@aol.com

DC’s monthly titles would have been cover-dated February. The bi-monthly titles were dated March, as were the Marvels that month (though there were few Marvel titles at the time). Your collecting plan sounds interesting, but there’s one book that you would want that will set you back a pile of money: AMAZING SPIDER-MAN #1.

As for pinpointing issues from a specific date, you could start with the Overstreet Price Guide and calculate cover dates from the info there. [My old pal Carl Gafford writes a monthly ‘zine “This Month in Comics” for CAPA-ALPHA, the comics apa. He highlights the books from 40, 35, and 30 years ago; he’ll cover December 1962 at the end of this year. Fellow K-a member Hurricane Heeran does the same with “This Month in the Golden Age,” reaching back to the dawn of comics and covering similar five-year intervals. Anyone interested in joining K-a can contact Central Mailer Merlin Haas at mvhaas@elpaso.net]

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This is the question you must get regularly, Bob:

‘Mazing Man? Anytime soon? Please? Can you get the rights of the character off DC and publish him anywhere? I’ll buy the book and I know ten people in London off the top of my head who will buy the book and that’s not even polling a comic book store!
If you do, can you tell Stephen DeStefano to revert to his older art style from the first few issues? ‘Mazing Man works better as a blast of color and visual oddity in the more restrained normal world. DeStefano’s more cartoony style of the specials kind of undermined this point…
– Giovanni from London (giospy@talk21.com)

Unfortunately, there are no plans to bring back ‘Mazing Man, much as I would enjoy revisiting his world.

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Was it ever directly stated in the comics that Prof. Potter was Lana Lang’s mother’s brother? After all, he could have been her father’s sister’s husband.
– James Dracoules (scryber96@aol.com)

I don’t know that it has ever been specifically stated which side of the family he came from, but I’m in agreement with Mark Waid that he is related by blood rather than marriage to Lana.

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I’m a comics retailer. Is there any rational explanation why DC didn’t do a Harry Potter movie adaptation?
– Bill Oppenheim (wbopp@webtv.net)

They didn’t have the rights to it.

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I just finished reading all your archived columns and I have two comments: There was an alternate Earth version of the Legion, where they were evil (Earth-3, 30th century?) that appeared in SUPERBOY #117.

Also, was Michael Ellis, who is credited with scripting JLA #255 a pseudonym?
– Jim (jefhamlin@aol.com)

Yes, the Boy of Steel did end up in an alternate universe with a group of evil Legionnaires in “Superboy and the Five Legion Traitors” (reprinted in LEGION ARCHIVES Volume 3). It was not identified as Earth-3, however.

I don’t recall who Michael Ellis is (or might have been). Sorry.

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Who came first: hen or egg
– banoof (banoof2000@yahoo.co.in)

In my opinion, the hen.

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Did any comics discuss the religion of Krypton in any detail?
– Carl Rosenzweig (cyberpyg@hotmail.com)

The topic was touched upon in a few stories, but there was never any detailed description or explanation of it that I recall.

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Whatever happened to Pandora Pann? It was supposed to appear first in SAGA OF THE SWAMP THING #5 and an ongoing series the next month. It was by Len Wein and Ross Andru. How many issues were completed?
— Scott (Kamandi2@aol.com)

Paging Len Wein! I recall the name of the series, but not much beyond that. Hopefully, Len can fill us in.

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I remember the death of Iris Allen as being the first “real” death in a comic I read. Of course, Gwen Stacy had died long before. My question is which comic in the “new” age had the first crucial character die in the pages, and also which would you say has had the greatest impact long term? I say it would be G.S. in both cases.
– Chris Faris (twoinchnipple@earthlink.net)

I presume you are talking about the post-Silver Age, Chris, in which case I’d say it’s a toss-up between Gwen and Iris. If we’re talking about the Silver Age, I’d have to vote for Uncle Ben, without whose death Spider-Man might be hawking products on some late-night infomercial instead of fighting crime.

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I have been an off and on reader of GREEN LANTERN and I am familiar with most of the Earthmen ringbearers. While online looking into GL related stuff, I heard a mention of a character named Charlie Vickers. Who is he?
– Leonard Pigg (leonard_pigg@hotmail.com)

Charlie Vickers is an Earthman who served as the Green Lantern of sector 3319 for a time. (Note to my official unofficial researcher, John Wells: Have you got more info on Mr. Vickers?)

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Outside of CrossGen Comics, no major publisher is producing sword & sorcery/fantasy comics. What are your thoughts on why this particular genre has suffered (outside of the obvious answer sales were down)?

Thanks for the time spent pondering my question,
– Rush Callahan (rush5150@hotmail.com)

There certainly isn’t a lack of such titles (many of which feature balloon-breasted, barely-dressed women warriors) from the smaller publishers. But I’d also have to put such books as the WARLANDS titles and A DISTANT SOIL (and even WITCHBLADE) published by Image into the category.

That DC and Marvel don’t do much in that arena could be the result of the number of other books out there and the potential audience a book from one or the other of the “Big Two” might reach. Certainly both publishers had a piece of that market in earlier times: Marvel with Conan and the rest of the Robert E. Howard characters and DC with THE WARLORD, CLAW, and others.

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Who was Supermans foe in the 5th dimension? We need this for a school report believe or not.
– Karen Powers (kp@brookstower.net)

Makes me wonder what they’re teaching in school these days. The answer, of course, is Mr. Mxyzptlk.

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I am trying to find a list of confirmed guests for the upcoming Wizard World East convention in Philadelphia. The only guest that their website list is Kevin Smith. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thank you,
– Adam Gary (apg100@hotmail.com)

The only information I can give you is that I am NOT one of the guests. One would hope that their website would be the first place to look for such info; beyond that, I haven’t seen any ads for the convention.


That will do it for this installment. If YOU have a question or comment, send it along using the handy box in the column on the left.

And even though I managed to crowd out the Trivia Quiz this week, you can still get a dose every day at Anything Goes Trivia at http://www.wfcomics.com/trivia.


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Ask BobRo at It’s BobRo’s Answer Board.

Copyright ? 2000 to 2003 by Bob Rozakis. All Rights Reserved.


 

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