Current Reviews

subheader

Godland #7

Posted: Friday, February 3, 2006
By: Michael Deeley



Writer: Joe Casey
Artist: Tom Scioli

Publisher: Image
Price: $2.99 USD


Last issue, I lamented how the art wasn’t up to the series usual standards. This time, it’s the writing that takes a hit.

New York City is invaded by ugly fairies from space riding beams of light that disintegrate anything they hit. Archer destroys them with help and a telepathic push from Maxim. His heroism goes unrewarded. Meanwhile, Nickelhead steals Discordia’s corpse for an obvious plan and dances. Yes, for the first time in comics history, the villain boogies.

This reads a lot like a Silver Age Marvel comic. I know the series is supposed to capture the cosmic vibe from old Lee/Kirby comics, but it’s done so with a modern twist. The first six issues displayed a hip self-awareness; a subversive tongue-in-cheek feeling that the characters themselves were vaguely aware of their comic-book existence and resisted the old clichés. But this story could actually BE an old Marvel comic. From the argument in the morgue to the public suing Adam Archer, this read like “The Amazing Spider-Thor.”

The scenes with Nickelhead and his one-word lackey Eghad keep the weirdness. We’ve got an argument over Field of Dreams, more of the Tormentor’s mice men, and my new favorite quote: “This mouth harp break smokes!”

I’m happy to say the art has improved over last issue. People look more natural (or at least as natural as the Kirby-style allows), and the action is bold. This issue also presents a new colorist in Nick Filardi. I honestly don’t see a big difference from previous issues. The colors are still bold primaries with computer-aided shading. A truly modern Silver Age look.

Ultimately, this issue sets up next issue. There’s more action provided here than in last issue, Maxim gains more of Archer’s trust while raising my suspicions, and we get those Superman/Clark Kent mice again. Next month promises the origin of the universe and Iboga. THAT should be exciting.



What did you think of this book?
Have your say at the Line of Fire Forum!