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ADVANCE REVIEW: 10th Muse: Revenge of Medusa #1

A comic review article by: Felicity Gustafson
This a series that revolves around Greek mythology, so of course I was instantly interested. I've always been a big fan of mythologies in general, but Medusa's one of my favorites, so I jumped when I heard this was released. "Revenge of Medusa" is a miniseries spinoff from the 10th Muse, the story of Emma Sonnet, an ordinary girl who finds out her father is really Zeus and she's the 10th forgotten muse. Actually, 10th Muse was one of the biggest sellers back in 2000, so if you were reading comics 11 years ago, I'm going to assume you've at least heard of this series already.



I'll start off by saying this comic has big potential to be something great. The basic plot is something I'm highly interested in because it presents the question "What if Medusa unleashed the Minotaur, one of the most deadly creatures, into the modern world?" That, I would love to read. As it is, this issue fell flatter than I would have expected. It's hard to put my finger on exactly why, but I'd say it's a lack of explanation. It doesn't really say why Medusa wants to wreak havoc and try to kill Emma, though I suspect it's in the 10th Muse series, or why she wants to use the Minotaur specifically. I got the feeling that Medusa was just a villain, so they wrote her to want to wreak mindless destruction. I was left with a blank feeling on the subject; I didn't really care about why she wanted the Minotaur or what she planned to do. I found myself sitting there waiting for something big to capture my attention, but unfortunately it didn't really happen. The idea was good and I like thinking about the subject, but the comic itself was a little bland.



The artwork was a different style than I'm used to, which was a pleasant surprise. Much more added detail and shading on everything, even in the background. It's apparent that Ellis spent a great deal of time drawing everything out perfectly. Certain aspects like how the Minotaur was drawn was done extremely well and others, like some of the male facial features, were a little off. The expressions on the Minotaur were spot on. I can imagine it'd be difficult to portray emotion through the facial features of a bull, but Ellis managed with flying colors. Overall, I enjoyed the artwork more than the story.



So this series has a good base, but it still needs some work. It's only the first issue, so I don't really see it as fair to condemn the series based on one comic. Hopefully it will pick up in the next issue.



Felicity Gustafson was born in Ohio and, after the astounding realization that there was more to do than look at trees and cows, she decided to become a nerd and got into comics, anime and video games. New to Comics Bulletin, she sticks mostly to reviewing things out of the horror and comedy genres. She spends most of her time working in the manufacturing industry, finishing her computer degree and steadfastly avoiding ham fat at all costs.

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