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Seven Soldiers of Victory: Zatanna #4

Posted: Saturday, November 26, 2005
By: Ray Tate



"Zor"

Writer: Grant Morrison
Artists: Ryan Sook, Mick Gray(i), Nathan Eyring(c)
Publisher: DC

"Hey, Gloom-Cookie. It's not the end of the world yet."

Now, that's a damn sight more creative than calling Misty "babe" all the time, and it's what I expect from Grant Morrison.

Zatanna does call Misty "babe" again, and Zee also refers to "The Crisis" in the finale of Zatanna. These incidents make me cringe, but they are the exceptions rather than the rule of the dialogue.

It's Zatanna vs. Zor, a sort of mirror universe Zatara, in an inventive gorgeous battle orchestrated by Ryan Sook, Mick Gray and Nathan Eyring. Within this arena, the dialogue crackles with threat and venom, strength and power.

There are certain passages that read a little more curious than others. It may be just me, but this final issue of Zatanna seems to touch upon not just the long reaching Seven Soldiers story-arc and Zatanna's personal demons but also politics.

"LIKE THUNDER IN THE CLOUDS MY VOICE ROLLS ACROSS AMERICA AND THE WORLD."

So states, Zor. Now, George Bush if he had a brain could only dream of speaking with such power, but the sentiment seems right up his alley, and I have to ask why Morrison a Brit would suddenly bind Zatanna to America. Morrison usually doesn't make such distinctions. His heroes' loyalties all seem to be independent of any one nation, and Zee of all the heroes seems given her career as a performer more apt to be an international player.

"I WILL MAKE PLAYTHINGS OF YOU ALL! YOU WILL LOVE AND KILL AND DIE AT MY COMMAND!"

Further states, Zor. And this is so far what Bush has done. Bush as sent his "toy soldiers" to kill and die at his command in Iraq and has demanded more sacrifice of those waiting to be sent. The love part could be interpreted as Bush's demands that we obey him without doubt and see only good in a war founded on his lies.

"AND BELIEF BECOMES A WEAPON MORE DEADLY THAN BOMBS."

So realizes Zatanna. That's Bush in a nutshell. His administration isn't based upon science or logic but belief in scripture. An underlying fundamentalist religious rationale can be found in every one of his actions. The cretin has publicly given his support for creationism. The war in Iraq can be interpreted as an extension of divine right--the perceived right of kings given by god to take whatever lands they like. The war on women is based upon the idea of their being "helpmates" and only good for seeding. The war on gays is based upon a passage in The Bible where some nut offers his daughters to the Sodomites who want to rape the angels in his care. Don't ask me how this pertains. I've heard the argument; loosely speaking, used, and I don't pretend to understand the alien tongue spoken by Pat Robertson and his insane Christ posse.

Putting aside my inferences on the meaning behind Morrison's words, Zatanna is a good solid adventure featuring a special effects laden battle between high-caliber magicians that does not once bore the reader. The finale answers the questions originally posed in issue one and does much to shine up the image Zee acquired because DC let a ham-fisted writer, who had absolutely no love for any of DC's characters, abuse her personality and her standing among fans.

Readers of the entire Seven Soldiers of Victory story will discover some answers revolving around the Time Tailor in The Guardian, and given Morrison's heritage as well as a very suspicious reference, there is no doubt in my mind that the Time Tailors were inspired by the Time Lords of Doctor Who.



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